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PRICE INCREASE NOTICE

Dear Valued Customers,

Please click on the following link for the latest price increase notice:

Price Increase 1st Nov 2017

Kind Regards,

Ropa Mhlanga

Operations Director – Southern African Region

Petra reports strong Q1 performance, despite strike, Tanzania export ban

Despite labour disruptions at LSE-listed Petra Diamonds’ Finsch, Koffiefontein and Kimberley Ekapa Mining (KEM) Joint Venture (JV) operations in late September, CEO Johan Dippenaar says the group achieved a strong start to the 2018 financial year.

Production for the quarter was down 4% year-on-year to 1.05-million carats, mainly as a result of the planned reduction in tailings production at Finsch and the KEM JV.

Run-of-mine (RoM) production, however increased by 17% year-on-year to 842 809 ct, despite the labour disruptions, which reduced RoM production by about 70 000 ct and tailings production by about 10 000 ct.

“The group is continuing its production build-up and it is encouraging to see the increasing contribution of RoM production,” commented Dippenaar.

The Finsch mine’s RoM production increased by 2% year-on-year to 467 795 ct, owing to improved RoM grades as a result of the continued ramp-up of the Block 5 sublevel cave, as well as owing to high-grade RoM surface stockpiles.

RoM production at Cullinan increased by 35% year-on-year to 250 001 ct, owing to the production ramp-up of the new processing plant. The XRL modules of the plant, which recover coarse material greater than 12 mm in size, were put into operation in September. Two diamonds larger than 200 ct have already been recovered.

At Koffiefontein, RoM production decreased by 19% year-on-year to 12 563 ct, as a result of the loss of about 3 000 ct of production during the labour disruption.

Petra on Monday reported that construction of the ore handling infrastructure at Koffiefontein would be completed in the quarter to end December 31, with RoM production to return to planned levels from the second half of the 2018 financial year.

The KEM JV’s attributable production also decreased by 29% year-on-year to 170 014 ct, with RoM treatment having increased as the modifications to the Central Treatment Plantwere completed.

Meanwhile, production at the Williamson mine increased by 66% year-on-year to 85 213 ct.

However, a ban on the export of Petra’s diamonds from Tanzania, which has now been lifted, negatively impacted on the group’s revenues for the first quarter. Revenues decreased by 17% year-on-year to $78.7-million.

The Tanzanian government on September 28 agreed to allow Petra to resume the export and sale of diamonds recovered at the Williamson mine. This followed the seizure, by government officials, of a parcel of diamonds earlier in September, owing to allegations that the company had under declared the value of the diamonds to be exported.

Petra on Monday said it was yet to realise sales from Williamson for the current financial year and that it continued to engage with the Tanzanian government regarding a solution for the 71 654-ct parcel of diamonds that remains blocked for export.

A 40 000-ct parcel of diamonds recovered at the mine has been shipped to Petra’s marketing office for sale in the second quarter of the 2018 financial year.

 

Source: Mining Weekly

Delays at Durban MPT Due to Severe Storm

Dear Valued Customers,

Please click on the following link for the details regarding the delays:

Delays at Durban MPT

Kind Regards,

Management

Rip up charter, provide tax incentives, back junior miners – Maimane

Mining Charter Three should be ripped up, proper tax incentives introduced and junior mining enterprises supported to restore investment in the mining industry, which is a stimulator of the South African economy as a whole, Opposition Democratic Alliance leader Mmusi Maimane said on Wednesday.

Delivering a keynote address on the first day of the fifth Joburg Indaba conference, Maimane said it is an indictment against South Africa and the mining industry that the country’s last significant diamond discovery was at Venetia 40 years ago.

He noted that Canada and Australia had far more listed mining companies than South Africa and the vast majority of these were relatively small mining companies.

He said Johannesburg should be the big mining capital and not Perth, but it was not, because South Africa had shut the door on new mining development through discouraging policy.

New mining developments were virtually non-existent despite thousands of mining rights having been issued to people with no interest or expertise.

“This is how we kill an industry,” he said, adding that in countries other than South Africa investors are able to gain mining right information online.

Ninety per cent of mining students are black and they should be the mining entrants of the future.

In the early eighties, mining contributed 21% to South Africa’s gross domestic product (GDP) but currently both mining and manufacturing have dropped out of the top three, with mining contributing only 5% of GDP.

 

Source: mining weekly

PRICE INCREASE NOTICE

Dear Valued Customers,

Please click on the following link for the latest price increase notice:

Price Increase 1st Oct 2017

Kind Regards,

Ropa Mhlanga

Operations Director – Southern African Region

Zambian copper production to grow by 7% this year, despite power challenges

JOHANNESBURG (miningweekly.com) – The Zambian government’s support for the mining industry and strong copper prices are expected to drive growth in the country’s copper production for this year, despite ongoing power shortages.

BMI Research on Monday pointed out that, according to data published by the Zambian central bank, Zambia’s copper production reached 362 000 t by June 30, down slightly from the 367 000 t produced in the first half of 2016.

“No details have been given by the Zambian authorities on this decline, but it is likely that Zambia’s ongoing power supply problems have been the key constraint on copper mining activities,” BMI said.

“We are positive on Zambian copper and maintain our forecast of 7% growth this year as Zambian President Edgar Lungu remains supportive of the sector, and rising copperprices incentivise domestic miners to ramp up production during the second half of the year.”

Ongoing power shortages resulting from the country’s dependence on hydropower and rising water tariffs are the key risks facing the Zambian mining sector moving forward.

In August, two of the country’s biggest copper producers, Glencore and First Quantum Minerals, were forced to reduce power at key operations, owing to tariff disputes with electricity provider Copperbelt Energy Corporation.

However, improving rainfall and rising dam levels in the country will ease some of power shortages experienced in recent quarters.

Another key driver of strong Zambian copper production this year will be the positive trajectory of prices in 2017 relative to last year.

Since touching lows of $4 500/t in June last year, copper prices have risen over 57% to $6 810/t in August owing to strong demand from China.

“While it is possible that prices may unwind from current levels towards the end of the year, we think the gradual uptrend over the last 12 months will bode well for mining activity in Zambia.

 

Source: Mining Weekly

PRICE INCREASE NOTICE

Dear Valued Customers,

Please click on the following link for the latest price increase notice :

Price Increase 1st September 2017

Kind Regards,

Ropa Mhlanga

Operations Director – Southern African Region

Technology set to unleash mining innovation – Anglo’s O’Neill

In the next ten years, technology is set to unleash a wave of mining innovation, with the sweet spot centred on changing the thinking around ore bodies and processing plants rather than much-spoken-about automation.

“Our focus has changed from hunting technologies to hunting value,” Anglo American technical director Tony O’Neill told Creamer Media’s Mining Weekly Online in an exclusive interview.

Three-dimensional metal printing, non explosive breakage of rock and microwave preconditioning of rock, as well as medical imaging equipment, are finding rapid application in mineral mining and processing.

The word in the industry is that mining companies that embrace the new era will be successful and the ones that do not will ultimately not survive. Anticipated are mines with footprints that can more readily coexist alongside a community in much the same way as farming.

The good news is that pathways are already starting to develop that change the current mining and processing paradigm.

Technologies are being reconfigured to make mining and processing far more precise, which offers massive potential reward.

Currently, much larger volumes of waste are brought to surface, compared with the scenario more than a century ago. This is because, outside of safety improvements, old methods are still being used today. For instance, in 1900, to obtain 40 kg of copper, 2 t of material had to be mined using 3 m3 of water and 10 kWh of energy, compared with currently having to mine 16 times more material, using 16 times more energy and drawing on double the volume of water.

“It’s risen at such a rate that it’s becoming unsustainable,” O’Neill commented to Mining Weekly Online.

While mining was, in the past, content to be a research and development laggard, other industries were not – and they shot ahead on the technological front, proving up technology that is now available off the shelf for mining to implement.

A successful pilot plant is already pointing the way for the more widespread introduction of coarse-particle recovery, which brings considerably larger-sized particles to surface and slashes water use.

Moreover, with the maturing of robotics technology, research is also being conducted into the introduction of swarm robotic mining, involving the use of small robots that will bring ultra-precision to a hugely wasteful industry.

As more precise mining methods gather momentum, those 40 kg of copper used to illustrate mining’s deteriorating position may one day be mined without any waste at all.

Coarse-particle recovery and advanced fragmentation (using smart blasting technologies) are good examples of putting existing technologies into new configurations to deliver value right now.

None of the technologies used is unproven, but what Anglo has managed to do is configure them in a way that adds immense value, with minimal additional capital investment.

While technology will have to be honed specifically for mining at some stage, a surfeit of technologies is ready for instant application.

“It’s more about a mindset change than having to make massive investments,” Anglo American technology development head Donovan Waller added to MiningWeekly Online.

Much of the improvement is being driven by data science and the modern world’s ability to analyse increasing volumes of data to a very high degree.

Virtually all the technologies needed have come of age; one of the biggest being the stabilisation of information technology, in which other industries have tended to advance much faster than the mining industry. These other industries include consumer electronics, manufacturing, automotive engineering and the pharmaceutical sector.

COARSE-PARTICLE RECOVERY

The coarse-particle recovery process captures coarse particles that are not recoverable using conventional flotation.

By needing to grind to only 500 micron instead of 170 micron, capacity is increased. Less energy is required in the crushing and grinding and water is more easily extracted from the larger particles and then recycled, significantly reducing the need for fresh water. The extraction of interstitial water results in a dry product, which can be dry-stacked, ultimately eliminating the need for tailings dams.

In copper, coarse-particle flotation has the potential to change the cost curve of the industry by allowing for 30% to 40% more throughput at a recovery loss of 2% to 3%, a 20% energy saving and 30% to 40% less water.

This is already a significant achievement for Anglo American in copper, and the company is hopeful of migrating it to other commodities, including platinum in South Africa, where test work is still at an early stage.

If, for example, platinum ore can be pre-sorted in advance and be presented at a grade of 10 g/t instead of 4 g/t, output can be increased by two-and-a-half times from the exact same capital invested.

SWARM ROBOTIC MINING

Swarm robotic mining descales mining to make it much more precise, mimicking the actions of a swarm of locusts devouring a field or an army of ants working independently to execute tasks.

The technology envisages highly selective mining of ore types linked to real-time algorithms across a broad spectrum that includes constraints in energy, prices and associated issues.

As many people as possible are taken out of harm’s way in a remotely controlled environment.

Small operational teams will communicate with each other, without the need for a big-brother view from the surface that controls each of those small operational elements independently in self-learning operations.

WATERLESS MINES

Currently, the industry spends a lot of time adding water to its processes and even more time trying to get the water out afterwards.

A pathway has been developed to end up with a waterless mine through the adoption of a closed loop, using only a fixed amount of water that is then recycled time and again. Anglo already recycles or re-uses more than 60% of its water requirements.

Ultimately, the aim is to arrive at potentially chemical means that allow for the liberation of particles without having to add water to them, to arrive at a waterless process.

SUN, WIND, GRAVITY AND SMALL, GREEN NUCLEAR

In terms of energy, the focus is on using renewables for energy self-sufficiency.

The solutions will be a combination of sun and wind. As the sun does not shine at night and the wind does not always blow, other energy forms, including gravity, will take advantage of the mining sector having depth as one of those solutions.

Ultimately, nuclear may be incorporated should it become “greener”, smaller and more modular, as is expected.

MODULAR CONCEPT

Instead of spending billions to build one big plant, small modular plants will be built and scaled up quickly, with the lifespan of the modules being influenced by the next step up in technology.

Mines will move away from using the same technology for long periods of time and outlaying large capital expenditure on plants that last for 50 years and more.

Smaller, modular, cheaper units will allow for technology upgrades every five years, providing scalability as well as the opportunity to ramp up on new technology that has arisen.

Although mining is not an industry that has been used to technological change, there is no reason why it should not, from now on, accelerate advancing technology quickly, as other industries do.

“Our Future Smart Mining program is about far more than technologies alone. It is end-to-end innovation, in its broadest sense, addressing all aspects of sustainability for the business – safety, health, the environment, the needs of our communities and host governments, and the reliable delivery of our products to customers. Those that innovate and are agile will thrive in this industry. That is mining’s new future.” O’Neill concluded.

 

Source: Mining Weekly

Continued reciprocal trade between S Africa, Australia predicted

Despite the current economic climate in South Africa and the global downturn in mining, owing to low commodity prices, South Africa and Australia will continue to build their reciprocal trade relationship, says law firm ENSafrica.

“South Africa is Australia’s biggest trading partner on the African continent and Australia has more mining projects in Africa than anywhere else in the world,” ENSafrica mining director Lloyd Christie tells Mining Weekly.

He adds that Australia looks westward for investment opportunities and recognises South Africa as its port of entry into Africa and the Southern African Development Community, which includes 15 African countries. “Australia continues to build on a constructive and mutually beneficial business relationship with South Africa.”

South Africa and Australia have similar legal systems, business cultures and practices, as well as accounting practices; and both countries are also well endowed with mineral resources and technical expertise, says Christie.

 These common traits make it easy to facilitate trade and, with the two countries forming the Australia–South Africa Joint Ministerial Commission in 1997, collaboration has increased ever since, he elaborates.

To aid continued collaboration, the Australia–Africa Minerals and Energy Group was established in 2010 to facilitate active engagements between the continents’ mineral resources industries.

Christie points out that, according to employers organisation the Australian Industry Group, there has been a 10% yearly average increase in trade between South Africa and Australiain the past five years.

“This serves as motivation to reinforce the relationship with Australian counterparts and continue attending events that facilitate trade.”

Therefore, ENSafrica will attend the annual Africa Down Under conference for the second time from September 6 to 8 in Perth, Western Australia, to interact and network with clients and investors, and learn about the latest developments in mining in Australia and Africa.

Further, Christie says legal certainty, which is an issue in some African countries, is often a consideration for investors, especially foreign investors such as Australia, when deciding to enter new markets.

“Africa’s labour unrest and factious industrial relations might also scare off mining investors. But, with the global miningindustry having to endure depressed commodities markets for many years, volatility is a natural consequence in any mining jurisdiction.”

He adds that declining commodity prices and profit margins can, ultimately, put strain on employee circumstances, as companies threaten retrenchment and are unable to increase wages. This is not unique to Africa, and is typically not an environment conducive to investment.

Regardless, there are still indicators of continued interest and investment in South Africa and other African countries, says Christie.

ENSafrica mining director Ntsiki-Adonisi Kgame says Australian mining companies still remain significant employers in Africa, which also encourages innovation and skills transfer between the involved countries.

“We’ve seen skills migration from South Africa to Australia, especially in terms of deep-level mining expertise. Australiahas recognised South Africa’s proficiency in this regard and has benefited from that skills transfer.”

ENSafrica plays a significant role in representing South African and Australian mining entities – such as diversified miners BHP Billiton and South32 – when navigating mergers, legislation and general trade issues regarding mineral resources.

 

Source: Mining Weekly

 

 

 

Efforts to reposition balance sheet, price improvements lift Glencore’s H1 earnings

Diversified mining and marketing company Glencore said “extensive efforts” to reposition its balance sheet and propel the company’s industrial asset portfolio improvements over the last two years were reflected in its strong interim financial performance.

The group on Thursday published its financial results for the six months to June 30, with adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation (Ebitda) and earnings before interest and taxes (Ebit) up 68% and 334%, respectively, year-on-year.

Net debt decreased by $1.6-billion to $13.9-billion between December 31, 2016, and June 30.

Earnings a share increased to $0.17 a share from a loss of $0.03 a share in 2016.

CEO Ivan Glasenberg said that, after a number of years of challenging commodity and economic conditions and declining prices, the recovery seen in late 2016 had continued into the first half of this year, which occurred amid the “best growth momentum” in the global economy in recent years.

Reflecting the success of its efforts to reposition the group during the recent economic downturn, adjusted Ebitda increased by about 70% to $6.7-billion during the six months under review, while net profit attributable to equity holders increased to $2.5-billion from a loss in the prior period.

Glasenberg said the turnaround was underpinned by higher prices for most commodities, resulting in margin expansion across Glencore’s key industrial assets and its “highly cash generative” marketing business.

Marketing performed above the implied run-rate of the $2.3-billion to $2.6-billion full-year guidance range provided in May.

First-half marketing adjusted Ebit was $1.4-billion, which was up 13% year-on-year, which was supported by generally supportive market conditions across the board as improving fundamentals created a more supportive marketing environment for the group’s core commodities.

Glasenberg commented that, supporting this result, evidence of the group’s efforts to reinforce the company’s “leading low cost positions” was seen during the period, with adjusted Ebitda mining margins up 36% in metals and 141% in coal.

“As we look forward, the potential large-scale roll-out of electric vehicles and energy storage systems looks set to unlock material new sources of demand for enabling underlying commodities, including copper, cobalt, zinc and nickel.

“Our portfolio of tier one commodities underpins our ambition to create significant long-term value for our shareholders,” he noted.

 

Source: Mining Weekly